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Archive for the ‘Program Evaluation’ Category

Evaluation of ADR in Michigan

Jennifer Shack, July 2nd, 2018

In 2011, an evaluation of Michigan’s court-connected case evaluation and mediation programs found that both case evaluation and mediation increased the probability of settlement, but that case evaluation significantly increased time to disposition. A newly published follow-up study, The Use of Case Evaluation and Mediation to Resolve Civil Cases in Michigan Circuit Courts: Follow-up Study Final Report (Courtland Consulting, May 2018), came to the same conclusion.

Case evaluation, in which a panel of expert neutrals makes a recommendation as to what the case should settle for, is mandatory for tort and medical malpractice cases. Mediation in most jurisdictions is voluntary, and can be used in conjunction with case evaluation. The study looked at a random sample of 358 cases (221 torts cases, 137 other civil cases) from three jurisdictions to determine what ADR process was used, the means by which the cases were resolved, and the time to disposition for each case.

The study found that for tort cases, there was no statistically significant difference in the form of disposition among the different options: no ADR, case evaluation only, mediation only, or both case evaluation and mediation, with a range of 71% (no ADR) to 92% (mediation) ending in a settlement or consent judgment. For other civil cases, both case evaluation and mediation (and both together) had higher rates of settlement than those cases that did not use ADR (47% for no ADR, 79% for case evaluation and 80% for mediation). The difference appears to be in the higher rate of dismissal/default judgment for cases in which no ADR process was used (49% v 21% for case evaluation and 13% for mediation). For both torts cases and other civil cases, time to disposition was considerably longer when case evaluation was used than when either mediation or no ADR was used.

When compared to mediation, case evaluation started later in the case and averaged longer to disposition from the point at which the ADR process ended. The delay could be attributed to case evaluation being rescheduled more often, although it wasn’t clear whether it was rescheduled without having been held or whether more than one session was needed.

While the findings regarding case resolution and time to disposition were similar to the 2011 findings, the lawyers and judges who responded to a survey about their perspectives on case evaluation indicated they were less satisfied with this process. Judges in particular were less confident in the effectiveness of case evaluation, with the percentage of judges who believed it was effective dropping from 69% to 53%. Attorneys had a much smaller dip, from 49% to 43%. Similar drops were seen in the percentages who would use case evaluation if it wasn’t mandatory. The percentage of judges who said they would use it dropped significantly, from 83% to 66%, while the already small percentage of attorneys who would in 2011 (36%) dropped to 29%.  The attorneys’ opinion of case evaluation was reflected in their comments about the panels. They complained that the panels lacked experience, were unprepared, were biased and did not address the merits of the case.

On the other hand, the judges’ and attorneys’ already high opinion of mediation remained steady. In 2011, 89% of the judges said mediation was an effective way to resolve disputes, compared to 93% in 2018. Attorneys were also much more likely to say mediation was effective than to say that case evaluation was, with 77% and 78% saying so in 2011 and 2018, respectively. While they had a high opinion of mediation, only 53% of attorneys said the mediators were highly skilled.

The comparison results were limited by a couple of factors. The cases that did not go through ADR processes were not similar to those that did. They were commercial cases, which are less complex, involve lower value claims, and require less discovery than other civil cases. Further, mediation was voluntary in most cases. This means the sample of mediation could be skewed by self-selection, in that the parties who decide to mediate could have been more motivated to settle and/or to settle early.

 

Reflecting on RSI Focus Groups in Washington, DC

Susan M. Yates, March 1st, 2017

Last week I had the honor of accompanying Jennifer Shack, RSI’s remarkable Director of Research, to Washington, DC. Jen is the principal investigator on an RSI evaluation of the child protection mediation program[1] in the DC Courts. I came along to facilitate the focus groups that are part of the evaluation. Each of the focus groups brought together a distinct group of lawyers who participate in mediation regularly: Guardians ad litem, lawyers for parents and prosecutors. The focus groups provided insight into how differing interests shape how mediation is perceived.

I found that my mediation skills, honed over many years, made it easy to shift into the role of focus group facilitator. Asking open-ended questions, encouraging everyone to participate and keeping the conversation moving were all familiar. Unlike mediation, the group didn’t have a goal of reaching agreement and I found that to be kind of liberating! What was more surprising to me was that it was difficult to remove my trainer/teacher “hat.” When a participant made a comment based on a misunderstanding of mediation, I had to resist the urge to engage in a conversation to educate the participant about mediation.

The groups of lawyers came from very different perspectives and often had different goals for mediation. (more…)

Getting the Story Right with Data to Make the Right Decisions

Jennifer Shack, October 20th, 2016

I’m a data geek. I love poring over data and running analyses to see what story unfolds. On the national level, data can tell us the story of our rise as an industrial power and how that changed how people lived and worked. On a local level, it can tell the story of how the closing of a factory affects the fabric of a community and the institutions that bind it. For foreclosure mediation programs, the data can tell the story of how homeowners are affected by changes to the program. Thus, I was eager to find out how changes to the court rules in the 19th Judicial Circuit of Illinois at the beginning of this year would play out. What story would the data tell? (more…)

Maryland Research Offers Insight into What Works (And What Doesn’t) in the Mediation Room

Jennifer Shack, June 29th, 2016

I had the honor of presenting at the Maryland Judiciary’s ADR Research Symposium a couple of weeks ago. The purpose of the symposium was to inform judges and court personnel of the results of a six-year research project examining ADR programs and processes. It reminded me of just how well Maryland has planned and implemented its ADR system. Because it serves as a model, I’d like to provide a little background about this before discussing the research. (more…)

Lessons Learned from Foreclosure Mediation

Susan M. Yates, June 14th, 2016

It is heartening to see that titles of two recent publications include the phrase “lessons learned” as they explore Illinois’ experience with foreclosure mediation. That phrase reflects Resolution Systems Institute’s perspective that we should consistently seek the lessons from current mediation programs to apply to the next ones to be developed. Not surprisingly, RSI staff wrote one of these articles!

These pieces – the one by RSI and the other by the Woodstock Institute – outline four and twelve “lessons learned” respectively. The publications are:

(more…)