Resources / Study / Innovation for Court ADR

Just Court ADR

The blog of Resolution Systems Institute

Archive for the ‘My Favorite Resource’ Category

My Favorite Resource Featuring Kevin Malone

Nicole Wilmet, August 29th, 2018

Our series, My Favorite Resource, features interviews with our court ADR friends across the country to learn about their favorite resource. This month, Resource Center Director Nicole Wilmet spoke with Kevin Malone, RSI’s Program Manager for the 16th Circuit Kane County Child Protection and Foreclosure Mediation Programs to learn about his favorite ADR resource.

NW: What is your favorite ADR Resource?

KM: I have several that I rely on, but the one I return to time and again is The Making of a Mediator by Michael Lang and Alison Taylor.

NW: Why do you value this particular resources?

KM: This book provides a great process for bridging the gap between theory and practice. Lang and Taylor provide tools to figure out what a mediator is good at, what they need to work on, and how to find that sweet spot between developing a mediator’s skills and tapping into a mediator’s talents.

NW: How did you first learn about this resources?

KM: It was assigned reading for my graduate work at the University of Denver’s Center for Conflict Resolution. I revisited the book when I began working as a co-mediator for our Child Protection Mediation Program.

NW: For those unfamiliar with this resource, what is one part of this resource that you wouldn’t want someone to miss? 

KM: Lang and Taylor have a chapter that walks the reader through their “constellation of theories”. A mediator will be able to figure out what theories they have tucked away and how those theories impact their practice of mediation. I have found this to be a very powerful tool in self-assessment and recommend all the mediators in my program at least once try something similar.

If you have a favorite resource you would like to share in an upcoming edition of our newsletter, please reach out to our Resource Center Director and Court ADR Connection Editor, Nicole Wilmet at nwilmet@aboutrsi.org!

My Favorite Resource Featuring Raeshann Canady

Nicole Wilmet, August 2nd, 2018

Our series, My Favorite Resource, features interviews with our court ADR friends across the country to learn about their favorite resource. This month, Resource Center Director Nicole Wilmet spoke with Raeshann Canady the Court Division Administrator for the Eighth Judicial District Court Clark County, Nevada, to learn about her favorite ADR resource.

NW: What is your favorite ADR Resource?

RC: I have two favorite ADR resources.  One is a training manual I received while taking an advanced mediation training with Ken Cloke, “Advanced Mediation Training: Maintaining Dialogue and Overcoming Impasse,” and one is the Resolution Systems Institute newsletter.

NW: Why do you value these particular resources?

RC: Both resources include information about research related to mediation.  Incorporating evidence-informed decision making into my practice is very important.

NW: How did you first learn about these resources?

RC: I learned about both resources from a faculty member at UNLV’s Saltman Center for Conflict Resolution.

NW: For those unfamiliar with these resources, what is one part of this resource that you wouldn’t want someone to miss? 

 RC: Don’t miss Ken Cloke’s discussion about research on “priming” and don’t miss the research-related section of RSI’s newsletter.

If you have a favorite resource you would like to share in an upcoming edition of our Court ADR Connection newsletter, please reach out to our Resource Center Director and Court ADR Connection Editor, Nicole Wilmet at nwilmet@aboutrsi.org!

My Favorite Resource Featuring Rebecca Price

Nicole Wilmet, July 3rd, 2018

Our series, My Favorite Resource, features interviews with our court ADR friends across the country to learn about their favorite resource. This month, Resource Center Director Nicole Wilmet spoke with Rebecca Price, the Director of ADR Program at the U.S. District Court of the Southern District of New York (“SDNY”), to learn about her favorite ADR resource.

NW: What is your favorite ADR Resource?

RP: My favorite ADR resources are my colleagues in and around other court ADR programs. This includes the relatively small number of other full time directors of federal district court ADR programs, the Federal Judicial Center, the local Community Dispute Resolution Center programs, and the SDNY Mediator Advisory Committee. Many of these people have been doing this work for decades and have nuanced and practical perspectives about court-annexed ADR.

NW: Can you share an example of when you turned to your network for support?

RP: There are so many! As a recent example, the SDNY is currently exploring automatic protocols for both personal injury and disability access cases. I reached out to colleagues in other federal courts for information about existing protocols and am working with the SDNY Mediator Advisory Committee to develop draft protocols. In 2013, the SDNY partnered with the New York City Bar Association to develop a mediator evaluation protocol. One of our most useful resources was the Director of the Office of Court Alternative Dispute Resolution in Portland, Maine, whose protocol became the blueprint for ours.

NW: In what ways have you found that your network has been better able to serve your needs than a traditional print resource?

RP: The primary difference is that conversations are dynamic in ways that print resources are not. Designing and implementing ADR systems is complex and context dependent and a person resource can adjust recommendations based on specific constraints. For me, the ideal print resource would read more like a “Choose Your Own Adventure” book than what is widely available. Having said that, I found the Maine program I referenced above in a footnote of a
journal article, so it’s important to cover your bases.

NW: What do you value most about the input you receive from other court personnel?

RP: It is so valuable to hear about what has worked or not, and why. There are some particularly special colleagues who can adjust their recommendations and information to the realities of different court programs. I also very much appreciate colleagues who speak candidly about mistakes. I learn from them and feel less isolated with my own challenges.

NW: How did you develop your network and what recommendations do you have for anyone looking to develop their own network?

RP: In an informal way, as I have worked in different places and with different people I have made connections with those I can reach out to and who can reach out to me. More intentionally, when I started my current position in 2012 there was no existing formal network for people in comparable roles. Through email and phone calls I was able to identify a group, create a listserv, and set up a date/time for monthly calls. I also realized early on that I would benefit greatly from an advisory committee of SDNY mediators. The first group created the protocols that have been followed by subsequent members, and we still meet monthly in person. What I would recommend for anyone wanting to build a network is that you create and maintain the space/time/modes of connection for the network itself, and that you commit to doing this for at least a couple of years if not more. It’s not magic, but someone needs to take responsibility for the consistency that allows networks to develop. Relatedly, the more you show up, engage, and support the efforts of others in and around your network, the more they will show up for you.

If you have a favorite resource you would like to share in an upcoming edition of our newsletter, please reach out to our Resource Center Director and Court ADR Connection Editor, Nicole Wilmet at nwilmet@aboutrsi.org!

 

My Favorite Resource Featuring Missy Greathouse

Nicole Wilmet, June 7th, 2018

Our series, My Favorite Resource, features interviews with our court ADR friends across the country to learn about their favorite resource. This month, Resource Center Director Nicole Wilmet spoke with Missy Greathouse, the Executive Director of Dispute Resolution Institute to learn about her favorite ADR Resource.

NW: What is one of your favorite ADR resources?

MG: Other than RSI’s website and newsletter (my number one favorite resources), my current favorite ADR resource is the newsletter of the Illinois State Bar Association’s Section on Alternative Dispute Resolution – In the Alternative.

NW: Why do you value this particular resource?

MG: On average there are six newsletters released a year, with updates on cases, ADR news and articles on topics of interest to those of us in ADR. I appreciate the information that is Illinois specific, but especially appreciate the opportunity to learn what is going on around the country.

NW: How did you first learn about this resource?

MG: When I joined the ISBA years ago, I learned about the newsletter when I signed up for the section. In addition, I have had the privilege of serving on the ISBA ADR Section Council for the last few years and have been able to see the work our editor puts into the newsletter along with the help of students from North Central College.

NW: For those unfamiliar with this resource, what is one part of this resource that you wouldn’t want someone to miss?

MG: I would definitely recommend the case briefs section to ensure you’re updated on the latest cases and how the ruling may affect our practice as ADR practitioners.

If you have a favorite resource you would like to share in an upcoming edition of our newsletter, please reach out to our Resource Center Director and Court ADR Connection Editor, Nicole Wilmet at nwilmet@aboutrsi.org!

My Favorite Resource Featuring Doug Van Epps

Nicole Wilmet, May 11th, 2018

Our series, My Favorite Resource, features interviews with our court ADR friends across the country to learn about their favorite resource. In April, Resource Center Director Nicole Wilmet spoke with Doug Van Epps, Director of the Michigan Office of Dispute Resolution to learn about his favorite resource.

NW: What is one of your favorite ADR resources?

DVE: Aside from the RSI website, which is my “go to” point of departure for most research questions, I frequently rely on the 3-volume set, “Mediation: Law, Policy & Practice,” by Cole, McEwen, Rogers, Coen, and Thompson, updated annually, and published by Thomson Reuters.

NW: Why do you value this particular resource?

DVE: This compendium of mediation research, practice, and state statutes has frequently been helpful in researching a gamut of mediation questions, e.g., the operation of confidentiality and privilege across the states, identifying the array of mandatory arbitration practices in the country, resources for specific dispute types, and a state-by-state encyclopedia of statutes, to name a few examples.

NW: How did you first learn about this resource?

DVE: A marketing brochure.

NW: For those unfamiliar with this resource, what is one part of this resource that you wouldn’t want someone to miss?

DVE: Acknowledging that this resource is probably most helpful for persons frequently researching policy questions, practices, procedures, and statutes across states, I’ve found it helpful just to periodically review my own state’s compendium of statutes so that I’m up to speed on how dispute resolution is evolving in branches of government beyond the judiciary.

If you have a favorite resource you would like to share in an upcoming edition of our newsletter, please reach out to our Resource Center Director and Court ADR Connection Editor, Nicole Wilmet at nwilmet@aboutrsi.org!