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Archive for the ‘My Favorite Resource’ Category

My Favorite Resource Featuring Christine Poulson

Nicole Wilmet, May 30th, 2019

Our series, My Favorite Resource, features interviews with our ADR friends across the country to learn about their favorite ADR resources. This month, Resource Center Director Nicole Wilmet spoke with Christine Poulson, Executive Director at Resolution Virginia, to learn about her favorite resource.

NW: What is one of your favorite ADR resources?

CP: I have spent twenty years working in community mediation. My go-to resource is the National Association for Community Mediation’s email list-serve.

NW: Why do you value this particular resource?

CP: There are hundreds of not-for-profit dispute resolution centers across that country that are trying to attain similar goals. These centers have a wealth of experience and they generously share that experience through the NAFCM list-serve so that no one has to reinvent the wheel. If I am having a problem at a center, likely someone else has had that same problem and has found ways to resolve it. If I want to start a program that someone else has run for years, I can get their “lessons learned” and save myself some failure. Perhaps most importantly, the list-serve helps me to feel that I am part of a supportive community that celebrates my successes and keeps me going when things are difficult.

NW: How did you first learn about this resource?

CP: As a NAFCM member for many years, I learned about the resource when the NAFCM Executive Director suggested I ask a question of the membership via the list-serve.

NW: For those unfamiliar with this resource, what is one part of this resource you wouldn’t want someone to miss?

CP: I would hate for people to miss out on the camaraderie of the group. People well-known (and not-so-well-known) in the field give so freely of their experiences. It really is a wealth of information.

Those interested in subscribing to the NAFCM Network can do so by sending an email to: nafcm-network-subscribe@lists.riseup.net.

If you have a favorite resource you would like to share in an upcoming edition of our newsletter and on our blog, please reach out to our Resource Center Director and Court ADR Connection Editor, Nicole Wilmet at nwilmet@aboutrsi.org!

My Favorite Resource Featuring Robyn Weinstein

Nicole Wilmet, May 1st, 2019

Our series, My Favorite Resource, features interviews with our ADR friends across the country to learn about their favorite ADR resource. This month, Resource Center Director Nicole Wilmet spoke with Robyn Weinstein, ADR Administrator at the United States District Court for the Eastern District of New York, to learn about her favorite resource.

NW: What is your favorite ADR resource?

RW:  One of my favorite ADR resources is the New York City Dispute Resolution Listserv (“NYC DR Listserv”). The NYC DR Listserv was created by Professor Maria Volpe, director of the CUNY Dispute Resolution Center at John Jay College. The NYC DR Listserv is an unmoderated listserv that was developed shortly after 9/11 as a way to connect the dispute resolution community. It has since grown into an information hub (in New York and beyond) for those interested in events, issues and concerns of interest to dispute resolvers. The NYC DR Listserv has several thousand active subscribers and those interested in subscribing can do so by clicking here.

NW: Why do you value this particular resource?

RW: The NYC DR Listserv is a powerful way for individuals and organizations to disseminate information about conflict resolution conferences, events, programs, awards, ADR competitions, new initiatives, and various issues that arise in the dispute resolution community. The NYC DR Listserv is an effective resource for those looking for information about trainings, symposia, networking events, and job opportunities. (The job I have currently was posted on this listserv.)  Some of the job opportunities are in New York City, but many of the opportunities are located around the world. I also value this resource because many of the members of the listserv are active and passionate about the field.

NW: How did you first learn about this resource?

RW: I first learned about this Listserv while I was a student at Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. At the time, I was a participant in the law school’s mediation clinic and was interested in learning about opportunities in dispute resolution.

NW: For those unfamiliar with this resource, what is the best way to use it?

RW: I would recommend signing up for the digest version of the Listserv, as there are several posts daily. Also, as is the case with many listservs, conversation threads can “heat up” resulting in lengthy back and forth discussions. The digest culls together all of the subject lines of each e-mail and makes it easier to skim through the listserv activity and choose the topics that are most relevant to you. Periodically, Professor Volpe sends out annual list of trainings and events, which gives a great overview of the breadth of conflict resolution activity in New York and beyond.

NW: Are there any other resources you enjoy that you would also like to mention?

RW: A burgeoning resource that I also wanted to share is the ADR Inclusion Network. The ADR Inclusion Network is a group of individuals dedicated to promoting diversity and inclusion in the field of ADR. The network members meet regularly and have begun to compile listings of events, articles and research relating to diversity in dispute resolution. The network also maintains a listserv where members of the network can post events, speaking opportunities, and share information and updates regarding their respective diversity and inclusion initiatives and efforts. Those interested in joining the network may do so here.

If you have a favorite resource you would like to share, please reach out to our Resource Center Director and Court ADR Connection Editor, Nicole Wilmet at nwilmet@aboutrsi.org!

My Favorite Resource Featuring Tracy Johnson

Nicole Wilmet, March 27th, 2019

Our series, My Favorite Resource, features interviews with our ADR friends across the country to learn about their favorite resource. This month, Resource Center Director Nicole Wilmet spoke with Tracy Johnson, Executive Director at the Georgia Office of Dispute Resolution, to learn about her favorite resource.

NW: What is your favorite ADR resource?

TJ: While I utilize many resources – including RSI as one of my go-to favorites, I have found my relationships with Georgia’s court professionals through the Georgia Council of Court of Court Administrators and my network of colleagues across the nation through the National Association of Court Management to be valuable sources of information and knowledge.

NW: Can you share an example of when you turned to your network for support?

TJ:  Building relationships with court professionals has afforded me the opportunity to see what others are doing, identify potential resources, and help in the implementation of new initiatives. At the most recent NACM conference, I attended a number of sessions on Online Dispute Resolution. I was then able to talk to some of those court administrators of the mentioned programs to get a better sense of successes and challenges and how that might translate for Georgia courts.

NW: In what ways have you found that your network has been better able to serve your needs than a traditional print resource?

TJ: Printed materials are a great resource, but are somewhat limited. My network of court administrators allows me the benefit of picking up the phone and calling my friend in another state to ask specific questions about his/her program. It allows me to build and develop relationships that aid in collaborative efforts.

NW: What do you value most about the input you receive from your network?

TJ:  Relationships with court professionals and the benefit of “rubber meets the road” approach to education. The educational programming of these organizations has a practical application component.

NW: How did you develop your network and what recommendations do you have for someone looking to develop their network?

TJ: Attend the conferences – a must for any court professional.

If you have a favorite resource you would like to share in an upcoming edition of our newsletter and on our blog, please reach out to our Resource Center Director and Court ADR Connection Editor, Nicole Wilmet at nwilmet@aboutrsi.org!

My Favorite Resource Featuring Tom Valenti

Nicole Wilmet, March 1st, 2019

Our series, My Favorite Resource, features interviews with our ADR friends across the country to learn about their favorite resource. This month, Resource Center Director Nicole Wilmet spoke with Tom Valenti, an experienced dispute resolution professional and founder of Valenti Law, to learn about his favorite resource.

NW: What is one of your favorite ADR resources?

TV: The resource that I have found most useful over the years is Kluwer Mediation Blog. Kluwer Mediation Blog is a comprehensive source of international articles. It publishes interesting articles from leading practitioners worldwide. Its database of articles is searchable, which makes it an excellent resource.

NW: Why do you value this particular resource?

TV:  As someone who keeps in touch with ADR issues internationally, I find it to be the best resource for me. I set up my account to send me an email when a new article is posted. The articles are published by leading practitioners. This is the beauty of Kluwer. It curates who can publish there, so you are reading reliable and interesting articles. I have found most of them worth reading, saving and cataloging.

NW: How did you first learn about this resource?

TV: As one who uses online research tools, I found the blog through a search engine, and then subscribed after finding it to be of high quality. As it turns out, I know many of the authors now, who are amongst those I look to in our field. For those who subscribe to my newsletters, there is usually an article from Kluwer in them.

NW: For those unfamiliar with this resource, what is one part of this resource that you wouldn’t want someone to miss.

TV: The blog has very useful searching and browsing functions, so if you are looking for something specific, you can browse by category, jurisdiction, date, author, etc., or you can use the general search feature.

If you have a favorite resource that you would like to share in an upcoming edition of our blog or newsletter, please reach out to our Resource Center Director Nicole Wilmet at nwilmet@aboutrsi.org.

My Favorite Resource Featuring Sally Campbell

Nicole Wilmet, January 30th, 2019

Our series, My Favorite Resource, features interviews with our court ADR friends across the country to learn about their favorite resource. This month, Resource Center Director Nicole Wilmet spoke with Sally Campbell, Dispute Resolution Services Manager for the Supreme Court of Virginia, to learn about her favorite resource. 

NW: What is one of your favorite ADR resources? 

SC: Aside from RSI, always a favorite resource, my favorite ADR resource tends to be what is helping me most at the moment. Appellate Mediation: A Guidebook for Attorneys and Mediators, an ABA publication written by experienced appellate mediators Brendon Ishikawa and Dana Curtis, tops my list right now.   

NW: Why do you value this particular resource? 

SC: Appellate Mediation contains a wealth of information for any mediator, whether newly minted or appellate veteran. I still marvel at this book’s promotion of a facilitative process with a client-centered, problem-solving approach – not what I expected when I first opened it. The book divides into five sections. The first, “Fundamentals of Appeals,” tackles appellate law basics, case evaluation, and decision tree risk analysis for case evaluation. The second, “The Appellate Mediation Process,” covers each phase of the mediation, with headings varying from “Explanation of the roles of the Mediator and Participants” and “People Get Angry; It’s Okay,” to “Brainstorm for as Many Options as Possible – Especially Options with Asymmetric Gains.” The “Practice Tips for Appellate Attorneys” section focuses on preparing attorneys and clients for mediation; strategies for the sessions; and crafting an enforceable agreement. “Practice Tips for Appellate Mediators” delivers excellent, detailed guidance for mediators.   

Finally, the Appendix packs a punch with great resources for appellate mediators, like sample phone call dialogue and sample documents. Appellate Mediation is eminently accessible with a user-friendly design that makes it easy to find specific information. The authors even include a chapter on mediator professional development. That chapter’s attention to the reflective practice process generated an a-ha! moment, and facilitated our goal to design the Mediator Self-Reflection Treasury to guide and support mediators even in solitary, first-time self-reflection.  

NW: How did you first learn about this resource?  

SC: In 2018, the Supreme Court of Virginia approved appellate mediation pilot projects to run for two years in the Supreme Court and the Court of Appeals of Virginia. I found this book while looking for resources to assist in the training of appellate mediators. It fit the bill so well that the trainer used it in the basic mediation course.  

NW: For those unfamiliar with this resource, what is one part of this resource that you wouldn’t want someone to miss?  

SC: For newer, non-appellate mediators, I would recommend Chapter 14 (“Phase 2, Information Exchange, and Phase 3, Identifying and Organizing the Issues”), although there is so much to be gleaned elsewhere in the book, I wouldn’t stop there. For seasoned mediators, I’d recommend Chapters 2 and 3, that address case evaluation as in “What is my best presently available option?” and case valuation through decision tree analysis. In this well-written, accessible book, these chapter materials aren’t nearly as daunting as they sound.     

This book might top my list for a long time to come. 

If you have a favorite resource you would like to share in an upcoming edition of our newsletter and our blog, please reach out to our Resource Center Director Nicole Wilmet at nwilmet@aboutrsi.org.